MILESIUS ANCESTRY

Ancestors of Milesius of Spain [1]

Information on this page from Windows Into Our Past, A Genealogy of the Parsons, Smith and Associated Families, Vol. 1 ©1996, Judy Parsons Smith

Adam [2]

Adam , b. created by God , d. 930 A.M., at 930 years old (3074 b.c.); m. Eve , b. created by God.  Her death is not recorded.  Adam & Eve had three (3) sons:

1.         Cain , b. 4002 b.c.
2.        Abel , b. 4001 b.c.; d. 3875 b.c.,  slain by Cain
3.      Seth , b. 130 A.M. (3874 b.c.)

Cain [3]

1.  Cain , son of Adam & Eve , b. 4002, b.c..  Cain had:

Enoch [4]

1.1.Enoch , son of Cain .  Enoch had:

Irad [5]

1.1.1.  Irad , son of Enoch , had:

Mehujael [6]

1.1.1.1.  Mehujael , son of Irad , had:

Lamech [7]

1.1.1.1.1.  Lamech , son of Mehujael , m 1st Ada; m 2 nd Zillah .

Lamech & Ada had two (2) sons:

1.1.1.1.1.1.  Jabal.  He was the first cattleman.
1.1.1.1.1.2.  Jubal.  He was the first musician.

Lamech & Zillah had two (2) children:

1.1.1.1.1.3.  Tabalcain .  He was the first foundryman in bronze and iron.
1.1.1.1.1.4.  Naamah (daughter)

Seth

3.  Seth , son of Adam & Eve , b. 130; d. 1042, at 912 years old.  Seth had:

Enos (Enosh)

3.1.  Enos (Enosh) , son of Seth , b. 235; d. 1140 at 905 years old.  Enos had:

Cainan

3.1.1.  Cainan , son of Enos, b. 325; d. 1235 at 910 years old.   Cainan had:

Mahalaleel

3.1.1.1.  Mahalaleel , son of Cainan , b. 395; d. 1225 at 830 years old.  Mahalaleel had:

Jared

3.1.1.1.1.  Jared , son of Mahalaleel , b. 460; d. 1422 at 962 years old.  Jared had:

Enoch

3.1.1.1.1.1.  Enoch , son Jared , b. 622; d. he did not die but was taken by God in 987, at the age of 365.  Enoch had:

Methuselah

3.1.1.1.1.1.1.  Methuselah , son of Enoch , b. 687; d. 1656 at 969 years old.  Methuselah had:

Lamech

3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.  Lamech, son of Methuselah, b. 874; d. 1651 at 777 years old.  Lamech had:

Noah[8]

3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.  Noah, son of Lamech, b. 1056; d. 2006 at 950 years old; m. Titea.  He divided the world among his sons.

Noah & Titea had three (3) sons:

3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.    Shem, b. ca. 1556; he was given Asia, within the Euphrates to the Indian Ocean.
3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.2.     Ham, b. ca. 1556; he was given Syria, Arabia, and Africa.
3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.3.      Japhet, b. ca. 1556

Noah may  also have had:

            3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.4.  Bith[9]


Shem [10]

I.  Shem , son of Noah & Titea , b. ca. 1556 A.M.; d. 2156 A.M. at 600 years old.  He was given Asia, within the Euphrates to the Indian Ocean by his father after the great flood.  Shem had:

A.        Elam

Ham [11]

II.  Ham , son of Noah & Titea , b. ca. 1556 A.M.  He was given Syria, Arabia, and Africa by his father after the great flood.

a.       Cush

b.       Mizraim

c.        Phut {Put}

d.       Canaan

Japhet [12]

III.  Japhet , son of Noah & Titea .  He was given the rest of Asia beyond the Euphrates, together with Europe to Gades.  Japhet had fifteen (15) sons among whom he divided the lands given to him.  Among these sons he divided the lands of Europe and a portion of Asia. 

Japhet fifteen (15) sons seven (7) of which are mentioned by name:

Gomer

Magog

Madai

Javan

Tubal

Meshech

Tiras

Magog [13]

Figure 1:  An example of Scythian art.

A drawing of a mule.

Magog , son of Japhet .  Among the descendants of Magog are the Parthians, Bactrians, Amazons, and others. Magog had:

Baoth [14]

Baoth , son of Magog .  Received the land of Scythia, from his father Magog.  Baoth had:

Phoeniusa Farsaidh (Fenius Farsa ) [15]

Phoeniusa Farsaidh (Fenius Farsa ), son of Baoth .

He was King of Scythia, during the reign of Ninus of the Assyrian Empire.  He was a wise man and desired to learn the new languages that were created at the time of the Tower of Babel.  In order to achieve this goal, he sent learned men from his kingdom out into the world to learn the languages that had come about at the time of the Tower of Babel.  Upon their return, he opened a school in the Valley of Shinar near Æothena.  It was here where he, and his younger son Niul , taught for 20 years together.  At this time he returned to his kingdom, leaving Niul the school that he had erected.  It was shortly after this that he died.  His descendants were known as the Fene.  Phoeniusa Farsaidh had:

Nenuall , who ruled as King of Scythia, after the death of his father.

Niul

Niul [16]

Niul , son of Phoeniusa Farsaidh ; m. Scota, daughter of Pharaoh Cincris [17], King of Egypt .

Niul was a very educated man.  He was well versed in the languages and sciences.  He taught in the school founded by his father for 20 years with his father and continued to teach after his father had returned to his kingdom.  In Æothena, he continued teaching  the languages and other sciences.  The fame of his learning reached the Pharaoh Cincris , King of Egypt who invited him to Egypt .  Pharaoh gave to him the land of Campus Cyrunt, near the Red Sea.  The descendants of Niul continued in the land given to him for three following generations.

Before the time of Moses /Goadhal , it  does not appear that the Egyptians had any knowledge of Alphabetical writing.  I would appear that their  knowledge of  such came  to them through Niul.  The actual credit for educating the Phoenicians and Egyptians, it was they who instructed, civilized and polished the Grecians.  The Phoenicians  were responsible for instructing them in navigation, writing, and commerce.  The Egyptians instructed them in the knowledge of their law and polity, also providing them with a taste for the arts and sciences, also initiating them into their mysteries.

It was Niul , who employed Gaodhal [Gael] to compose and refine the language called Bearla Tobbai, later commonly called Gaodhilg.  Niul named his eldest son after the newly created “ language ” Gaodhilg.  Gaodhilg is now known as Gaelic.

According to ancient Irish historians, the Nile River was named after Niul .  Niul’s wife Scota was said to be the daughter of Pharaoh who rescued Moses from drowning in the Nile.  Niul and Scota are said to have taken a great interest in his welfare and education.[18]

Ancient History

The Nile River was so called after Niul , husband of Scota, daughter of Pharaoh.  This same Scota is reputed to have rescued Moses from the river (Exodus 2:5). [19]

The Ancient Gaelic Alphabet consisted of 16 letters.  The letters were named after shrubs and trees.  They were arranged in this order:  B L F S N D T C M G R, and A O U E I.  The modern Gaelic Alphabet consist of 18 letters arranged in this order:  A B C D E F G H I L M N O P R S T U.  The name of the letters are:

A             Ailm        fig or palm tree

B             Beith       birch tree

C             Coll         hazel tree

D             Dair        oak tree

E             Eadha aspen tree

F              Fearn  alder tree

G             Gort        ivy

H             Uath       white thorn

I               Ioga        yew tree

L              Luis        wild ash

M             Muin       vine tree

N             Nuin       ash tree

0              Oir           broom tree

P             Peith       dwarf elder

R             Ruis        bore tree

S             Suil         willow tree

T              Teine  furze or whin bush

U             Ur            heath shru

Niul had:

Gaodhal (Gathelus ) [20]

Gaodhal, son of Niul .

The name Gaodhal is a compond word meaning “a lover of learning”.  Gaodhal in his youth was bitten in the neck by a serpent.  Upon which he was taken to Moses , who laying his rod upon the wounded place, instantly cured him.  After that time the word “glas” was added to his name, Gaodhal Glas (signifying the green scar that remained on his neck after the wound was healed).  A further blessing received by Gaodhal was – “that no venomous beast can live any time where his posterity should inhabit; which is verified in Creta or Candia, Gothia or Getulia, Ireland, etc.”  From this time forward, they painted the figures of Beasts, Birds, etc. on their banners and shields in order to distinguish their tribes (imitating the Iraelites).  A “Thunderbolt: was added to the standard of the chief for many generations.  This dates the beginning of Gaelic Heraldry.  The descendants of Gaodhal Glas were known as the Gadelians[21].

Godhal Glas had:

Asruth [22]

Asruth , son of Godhal Glas.  Continued in Egypt and ruled his colony in peace.  Asruth had:

Sruth [23]

Sruth , son of Asruth .

In the time of Pharaoh en Tine , the Egyptians turned upon his colony killing many Gadelians.  This change in the policy of the Egyptians was attributed to the animosities that they felt toward the Gadelians.  These animosities derived from the part that they taken when the Israelites fled from Egypt .  Sruth fled the country and after traveling the sea arrived at the Island of Creta [this is the present day island of Candia].  Here on the Island of Candia was where he paid his last tribute to nature.

Sruth departed from Candia, leaving behind part of the colony, they migrated to Getulia on the North of Africa (near the location where the city of Carthage [a walled city] was later built).  Some of the group later sailed toward the Land of Canaan , they landed on the island of Sor (near its’ coast).  It was here that they settled the city of “Tyre”, this colony became known as the Tyrians.  The Tyrians were allotted a tract of land in the north-west of Palestine, the territory was later known as Phoenicia[24].

THE  JOURNEY  TO  IRELAND

Journey to Ireland

The journey to Ireland began with Noah ’s son Japhet .  His son Magog , was given the lands near the Black Sea.  They established themselves upon the Island of Scythia.  Niul was invited to come to Egypt by the Pharaoh.  The descendants of Niul led by Sruth left Egypt and settled on the Island of Crete.  They left Crete led by Heber Scut .  They returned to their homeland of Scythia.  Under the leadership of Lamhfionn the family removed from Scythia to a place in Libya near Carthage.  After remaining in Lybia for eight (8) generations, they removed to Brigansa in Portugal .  Milesius of Spain , departed from Spain to visit his ancestral homeland of Scythia.  Milesius’ reputation had spread into Egypt , where Pharaoh invited him to come.  Milesius left Scythia and traveled to Egypt .  From Egypt he returned to Spain , arriving before the death of his father.  Heremon , son of Milesius, and his brothers invaded Ireland in the Year of the World 3500, after the death of their father.  Today their descendants reside through out the world.

 Sruth had:

Heber Scut [25]

Heber Scut , son of Sruth . d. slain in battle by Noemus , the former king’s son.

Heber Scut , left Creta one year after the death of Sruth .  Some of the family remained, and are inhabitants there to this day.  There are no venemous serpents on the island of Creta.  Heber Scut arrived at the ancestral island of Scythia where they were refused a place to inhabit.  They then fought the inhabitants (descendants of Nenuall ) for the sovereignty of the Island.  Here Heber fought many battles, always being the victor.  He then took the sovereignty from the descendant of Nenuall and settled his colony in Scythia.  Heber Scut was able to obtain rule of the colony and remained there for four generations.

Heber Scut had five (5) sons[26]:

Beouman , b. probably Creta

Agnamon , b. Scythia

Tait , b. Scythia

Adnoin , b. Scythia

Lamphion , b. Scythia

Beouman [27]

Beouman , son of Heber Scut , was the King of Scythia.  During his reign however, remained at war with the descendants of Nenuall .  Beauman had:

Ogaman [28]

Ogaman ,, son of Beauman, was the King of Scythia.  During his reign however, remained at war with the descendants of Nenuall .  Ogaman had:

Tait [29]

Tait , son of Ogaman , was the King of Scythia.  During his reign however, remained at war with the descendants of Nenuall .  Tait had:

Agnon [30]

Agnon , son of Tait .  Agnon and his followers left the island of Scythia and took to the sea.  They wandered upon the Caspian Sea for several years (possibly seven), during which time Agnon died. Agnon had:

Lamhfionn [31]

Lamhfionn , son of Agnon , d. near where Carthage (Lybia) was built.

Lamhfionn remained at sea for some time after his father’s death.  Stopping from time to time, at such islands as they came to, where they rested and refreshed themselves.  One of the islands on which they landed was the country of the Amazons[32].

During this time Cachear, their magician/Druid, foretold that they would wander until they arrived at the Western Island of Europe (Ireland).  This western island was destined for their future and lasting home.  However, it was not their destiny, but their posterity after a period of three hundred (300) years.  Lamhfionn ’s fleet landed at Gothia (Lybia), where Carthage was later built. 

Lamhfionn had:

Heber Glunfionn [33]

Heber Glunfionn, son of Lamhfionn, b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  His descendants were kings or chief rulers there for eight generations.  Heber Glunfionn had:

Agnan Fionn[34]

Agnan Fionn, son of Heber Glunfionn, b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  King of Gothia (Getulia).  Agnan Fionn had:

Febric Glas [35]

Febric Glas , son of Agnan Fionn , b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  King of Gothia (Getulia).  Febric Glas had:

Nenuall [36]

Nenuall , son of Febric Glas , b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  King of Gothia (Getulia).  Nenuall had:

Nuadhad [37]

Nuadhad , son of Nenuall , b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  King of Gothia (Getulia).  Nuadhad had:

Alladh [38]

Alladh , son of Nuad, b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  King of Gothia (Getulia).  Alladh had:

Arcadh [39]

Arcadh , son of Alladh , b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  King of Gothia (Getulia).  Arcadh had:

Deag [40]

Deag , son of Arcadh , b. Getulia (Lybia); d. Getulia (Lybia).  King of Gothia (Getulia).  Deag had:

Brath [41]

Brath , son of Deag , b. Getulia (Lybia).

Brath was the King of Gothia (Getulia). Remembering the Druid’s prediction, he gathered his people together in a large fleet and set out  for the destined settlement.  After a time the fleet landed in upon the coast of Spain , where  settled in Galicia, in the North of Spain by force.

Brath had:

Breoghan (Brigus ) [42]

Breoghan (Brigus ), son of Brath .

It was under the direction of Breoghan that the Gadelians removed from Getulia in Africa.  Their journey ended in Spain .  It was here that he built Breoghan’s Tower in Galicia and established the city of Brigansa (Braganza) in Portugal .  The kingdom of Castile gleaned it’s name from the figure of a castle on the Arms that were bore by  Brigus .  Breoghan was the king of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal .  He conquered all of these kingdoms.  The  kingdom of Castile derived its name from the figure of a castle, which Breoghan bore on as his Arms on his banner.

Under his direction a colony was sent to Britain.  They settled in the territory known as the counties of York, Lancaster, Durham, Westmoreland, and Cumberland.  These colonist became known as the Brigantes, who later were formidable opponents for the Romans at the time of their invasion of Britian.

Breoghan had ten (10) sons[43]

Cuailgne

Cuala

Blath

Aibhle

Nac

Breagha

Faad

Muirtheamme

Ith/Ithe - sent by Milesius to explore Ireland.  He had a son Lugadh.

Bilé

Bilé [44]

Bilé , son of Breoghan .  Bilé was the king of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal after the death of his father.  Bilé had:

Milesius (Galamh) of Spain

ANCIENT  IRISH  NOBILITY

Milesius of Spain [45]

Milesius (Galamh) of Spain , son of Bilé , m1st Seaug, daughter of Riffloir , King of Scythia, d. after birth of second son[46]; m2nd Scota, daughter of Pharaoh Nectonibus , king of Egypt .

Milesius ’ shield bore:  three Lions in his shield and standard.  Milesius choice of three lions for his shield is said to date to his journies before his father’s death.  It was during that time that he ventured into Africa where, it is said that by his cunning and valour, he slew three lions in one morning.  In memory of such a valiant exploit, he thereafter bore three lions on his shield.  His descendant still bear a lion on their shields and banners, varying in color, some with additions and other differences.

Milesius traveled to Scythia during his father’s lifetime, to visit his homeland.  There the ruling Prince Riffloir made him Prime Minister and General-in-Chief of the king’s forces[47].  While serving in this capacity he defeated the enemies of the king and gained great fame and love from the king’s subjects.  The King of Scythia grew concerned and secretly sought to get Milesius out of the way.  Milesius learning of the plot, slew the king.  After the death of his wife, Seaug, he and left Scythia, traveling on to Egypt .   Upon his arrival in Egypt , Pharaoh Nectonibus , after learning of his great valor, wisdom and conduct in arms, made him General of his forces against the king of Ethiopia.  At this time the Ethiopian’s were invading Egypt .  Milesius once again was victorious, he forced the enemy to submit to the terms of peace set forth by the Egyptians.  He was rewarded by Pharaoh with his daughter, Scota, in marriage.  After his marriage he remained in Egypt for another eight (8) years.  This was the same Pharaoh who gave another one of his daughters in marriage ot Solomon .

While in Egypt , Milesius had the most ingenious and able persons among his people to be instructed in the arts, trades and sciences that were used there.  Those that were trained were later to teach the rest of his people upon their return to Spain .  Upon his return to Spain , he had to repel invading forces who had come into the country after his father’s death.  His arrival was met with great joy by his people, who had been harrassed and by the rebellion of of the natives during his absence.  He defeated the invaders in fifty-four battles, routing them from the country.  After which the country settled in to peace and quietness.  During his reign a famine, of twenty-six (26) years, occurred.  Milesius superstitiously believed that the famine was due to the judgment and punishment of their gods, for their negligence in seeking out the country that was destine for their final home (as foretold by their Druid/magician).

In order to comply with what he believed to be the will of his gods, Milesius sent his uncle Ithe & his son Lughaidh (Luy) together with 150 stout men to bring him an account of the western island.  They landed on the island, at what is now called Munster.  There they found that the MacCuill, the husband of Eire, ruled and governed the country, being of the Clan-na-Milé (or the sons of Milesius).  Ithe met with the brothers, who were ruling the country, and they found him to be delightful, pleasant, and fruitful company.  Ithe left to return to his ship, and go back to Spain .  The brothers, upon reflection, suspected that the purpose of the trip was to bring others to invade.  They sought to prevent the invasion by pursuing Ithe.  They were able to overtake him and slew him, the location of this fight came to be known as Magh Ithe or “The plain of Ithe” (located in the present day county of Donegal).  Ithe’s son took his body back to Spain and exposed it to the people, which excited the people to avenge his murder.

Milesius made preparation to invade Ireland, and avenge his uncles’ murder, which was also in obedience with the will of the gods.  Before he was able to launch the invasion he died, leaving the expedition to his sons.  Milesius was a valiant champion, a great warrior and was fortunate and prosperous in all of his undertakings.  He was said to have been victorious in a thousand battles, in Spain as well as all the other countries and kingdoms in which he traveled in his younger days.

Milesius & Seaug had two (2) sons[48]:

·         Donn, b. Scythia; d. lost at sea near Teagh Duinn, trying to take Ireland.

·         Aireach, b. Scythia;, d. lost at sea near Inver Colpa, trying to take Ireland.

Milesius & Scota had six (6) sons[49]:

·         Heber Fionn , b. Egypt ; d. 1698 B.C., slain by Heremon at the Battle of Geisiol.  Desendants include the provincial Kings of Munster,  most of the nobility and gentry of Munster, and many noble families  in Scotland.

·         Amhergin , b. Egypt ; d. ca. 1698 B.C., slain in battle by Heremon .  Arch-Druid of Ireland.

·         Ire , b. Irene, Greece; d. lost at sea, shipwrecked on the southern shore of Ireland, trying to take Ireland, buried at Middle Skellings, Ireland.  Desendants include the provincial Kings of Ulster, ancient nobility and gentry of  Ulster, many noble families in Leinster, Munster, and Connaught, and the Clan-na-Rory in Scotland.

·         Colpa , b. aboard ship between Greece & Spain ; d. lost at sea near Inver Colpa.

·         Aranann , b. Spain ; d. lost at sea, ship floundered.

·         Heremon , b. Spain

Milesius ’s sons did not neglect the invasion that their father had prepared to undertake.  They set out from Breoghan ’s Tower (Corunna) in Galicia, Spain and sailed to the coasts of Ireland.  Along the coast they met with many difficulties and various chances before they were able to land.  The Tuatha-de-Danans use the diabolical arts, sorceries, and enchantments to obstruct their landing.  They enchanted the island so that it looked to be in the form of a hog.  A great storm was raised and the Milesius fleet was dispersed, many of the ships being lost.  Wholly five of the eight sons of Milesius were lost at sea.  The fleet under the command of Heremon landed below the City of Drogheda, near the mouth of the River Boyne.  Herber & Amergin (with Scota, their mother), and Lugadh (son of Ithe) landed at Inver Skeiry [later known as Bantry in the County of Kerry].  There they fought and overcame the Tuatha-de-Danan.  Their Kings and Queens were slain and their army destroyed.  The remaining were never able to further oppose the Clan-na-Milé.  Thus the sons of Milesius’ sons fullfilled the prophecy of the the Druid, Cachear, giving to the Milesian Race the homeland for which they had been searching.  The conquest of of Ireland by the Milesian’s took place in the Year of the World 3500 [this corresponds with the year following the beginning of the foundation fo the Temple of Jerusalem by Solomon ].  According to the computation of time by the Irish, the conquest took place in Anno Mundi 5199.

The lands of Erin were divided as follows:

To Heremon :  Leinster & Heber Munster

To Herber Don (son of Ir), the Kingdom of Ulster

To Lugadh (son of Ith), the sovereignty to Corca Luidh

Beginning of the Milesian Rule of Ireland

Heremon [50]

Heremon , son of Milesius of Spain , b. Spain ; d. 1683 B.C.

After the deaths of his brothers, Heremon became the sole Monarch of Ireland.  As such he divided the land amonst his comrades and friends.  The divisions were as follows:

Heber’s sons received the South part now called Munster:

Er

Orba

Feron

Fergna

Ithe’s [the first  Milesian discoverer of Ireland] son received a part  of Munster:

Lughaidh

Ir’s only son, received the North part now called Ulster:

Heber Donn

One of his commanders, received the East part now called Leinster:

Crimthan-sciath-bheil

One of his commanders, received the West part now called Connaught:

Un-Mac-Oigge

During the time that Heremon reigned, the Picts (or Cruithneaigh) arrived in Ireland and requested that they be given a part of the country to settle in.  Heremon refused to provide them with land to settle in, however they were the widows of the Tuathade-Danans, who had been slain in battle.  Heremon sent them together with a strong army of his own to conquer the country that they called Alba (now known as Scotland), under the condition that they should pay tribute to the Monarch of Ireland for posterity.  From Heremon descended 114 Monarch of Ireland; the provincial Kings & Heremonian nobility and gentry of Leinster, Connaught, Meath, Orgiall, Tirowen, Tirconnell, and Clan-na-boy; Kings of Dalriada; all the Kings of Scotland beginning with Fergus Mor Mac Earca  up until the Stuarts; and the Kings and Queens of England beginning with Henry the Second to present.

Heremon had four (4) sons:

Muimne , d. slain by Heberian successors

Luigne , d. slain by Heberian successors

Laighean , d. slain by Heberian successors

Irial Faidh

Irial Faidh [51]

Irial Faidh , son of Heremon , d. 1670 B.C., bur. at Magh Muagh.

Irial Faidh was a very learned king.  His name “faidh” is Irish for prophet.  It was said he could foretell things to come.  He won four remarkable battles against his enemies.  The first battle was against Ard Inmath at Teabtha; the second was against Fomhoraice at Teanmhuighe;  the third was the battle of Loch Muighe; the fourth and final battle was at Cuill Martho were the four sons of Heber were defeated.

He built seven royal palaces, to-wit:


Rath Ciombaoith

Rath Coincheada

Rath Mothuig

Rath Buirioch

Rath Luachat

Rath Croicne

Rath Boachoill

Eithrial [52]

Eithrial , son of Irial Faidh , d. 1650 B.C., slain by Conmaol at the battle of Soirrean, in Leinster.

Eithrial was the 11th Monarch of Ireland.  He was a learned king.  He wrote the History of the Gaels (or Gadelians).  During his reign several large wooded areas were cleared and there were advances made in agricultural practices.  Eithrail had:

Foll-Aich[53]

Foll-Aich, son of Eithrial , had:

Tigernmas [54]

Tigernmas , son of Foll-Aich, d. 31Oct 1453 B.C., Magh Sleaght (Field of Adoration), co. Leitrim. 

He was the 13th Monarch of Ireland.  He fought 27 battles with the followers of the family of Herber Fionna in which they won.  He introduced Idolatry to Ireland during his rule.  Gold and silver mines were discovered during this time and during his reign gold was mined near Liffey.  The gold  was  skillfully worked by Inchadhan.  Tigernmas made a law requiring that each “grade” or class of society be identified by the number of colors of it’s wearer.  The system of colors was:

Occupation

Number of Colors

Mechanics/workmen

1

Soldiers

2

Officers

3

Keepers of hostels for travelers or strangers

4

Nobles

5

Historians or learned men

6

Kings and Royal Princes

7

This custom is believed by many to have been the origin of the Tartans of the Scottish Highlands.  Thus this ancient practice continues on today.    At the time of his death, Tigernnmas, was worshiping the Sun-God , Crom Cruach , it was here that he together with two-thirds of the people of Ireland died in 1543 B.C. 

Irish Surnames & Addfixes

Common surnames and addfixes found within the pages of the ancient Irish nobility.[55]

Surnames

Aongus/Æneas – excellent, strength

Art – noble, great, generous

Brian – powerful, strength

Cairbre – ruler of the chariot

Conall – friendship

Cormac – the son of the chariot

Domhnall – the world, all mighty

Eochadh – a knight or horseman

Feargal  a valiant warrior

Fergus – a strong warrior

Fionn – fair-haired

Muircheartach – a naval warrior

Niall – noble knight or champion

Ruadhraige – the valiant, or red-haired king

Addfixes

Beag/Beg - small

Clann/Clon - children, race, descendants

Fear - man

Mac - son or descendant of

Og - young

Rath - a fort stronghold

Tigernmas had:

Enboath [56]

Enboath , son of Tigernmas .  The kingdom was divided into two parts, with the dividing line from Drogheda to Limerick, during Enboath’s lifetime.  Enboath had:

Smiomghall [57]

Smiomghall , son of Enboath .  During his lifetime, the Picts in Scotland were required to pay homage to the Irish Monarchs.  Seven large woods were cut down during his reign.  Smiomghall had:

Fiacha Labhrainn[58]

Fiacha Labhrainn, son of Smiomghall , d. 1448, B.C., slain by Eochaidh Mumho , in the battle of Bealgadain.  He fought in the battle fo Carman, slaying Eochaidh Faobharglas .  The inhabitant of Scotland were brought under control of the Irish Monarchy. Fiacha Labhrainn had:

Aongus Olmucach [59]

Aongus Olmucach , son of Fiacha Labhrainn, d. 1409 B.C., slain by Eana, in the battle of Carman.

He was the 20th Monarch of Ireland.  It was during his reign that the Picts refused to pay the tribute that had been imposed upon them some 250 years prior.  Aongus Olmucach took a strong army into Alba and overcame them thorugh a series of thirty (30) battles.  Thus forcing them to pay the required tribute, which had been imposed on them.  Aongus Olmucach had:

Main [60]

Main , son of Aongus Olmucach .  During the lifetime of Main, as a reward for bravery in the Irish militia shields of silver were given.  Main had:

Rotheachtach [61]

Rotheachtach , son of Main , d. 1357 B.C., slain by Sedne , of the line of Ir.  He was the 22nd Monarch of Ireland.  Rotheachtach had:

Dein [62]

Dein , son of Rotheachtach .  The practice of wearing gold chains around their necks [showing to all a sign of their birth] by the gentlemen and noblemen was begun, during the lifetime of Dein.  Also during this time, brave soldiers were rewarded with a golden helmet.  Dein had:

Siorna Saoghalach [63]

Siorna Saoghalach , son of Dein , d. 1030 B.C., Aillin, slain by Rotheachta .  He was the 34th Monarch of Ireland.  He received the nickname of Saoghalach due to the extraordinary length of his life.  Siorna Saoghalach had:

Olioll Aolcheoin [64]

Olioll Aolcheoin , son of Siorna Saoghalach , had:

Gialchadh [65]

Gialchadh , son of Olioll Aolcheoin , d. 1013 B.C., killed by Art Imleach .  He was the 37th Monarch of Ireland.  Gialchadh had:

Nuadhas Fionnfail [66]

Nuadhas Fionnfail , son of Gialchadh , d. 961 B.C., slain by Breasrigoghacta, his successor.  Nuadhas Fionnfail had:

Aedan Glas [67]

Aedan Glas , son of Nuadhas Fionnfail, he was the 39th Monarch of Ireland.  The reign of Aedan Glas was plagued with an infestation of pirates along the coast.  As a result of the infestation of pirates, a dreadful plague (Apthach) swept through the inhabitants of Ireland.  Aedan Glas had:

Simeon Breac[68]

Simeon Breac, son of Aedan Glas, d. 903 B.C., torn asunder by order of Duach Fionn.  He was the 44th Monarch of Ireland.  Simeon Breac had:

Muredach Bolgach[69]

Muredach Bolgach, son of Simeon Breac, d. 892 B.C., slain by Eadhna Dearg.  Muredach Bolgach had two (2) sons:

Duach Teamhrach, had two sons:

Eochidh Framhuine

Conang Beag-eaglach

Fiacha Tolgrach

Fiacha Tolgrach[70]

Fiacha Tolgrach, son of Muredach Bolgach, d. 795 B.C., slain by Oilioll Fionn.  He was the 55th Monarch of Ireland.  Fiacha Tolgrach had:

Duach Ladhrach[71]

Duach Ladhrach, son of Fiacha Tolgrach, d. 737 B.C., slain by Lughaidh Laighe.  He was the 59th Monarch of Ireland.  Duach Ladhrach had:

Eochaidh Buadhach [72]

Eochaidh Buadhach , son of Duach Ladhrach .  The kingdom of Eochaidh Buadhach was visited by two plagues.  Eochaidh Buadhach had:

Ugaine Mòr [73]

Ugaine Mòr son of Eochaidh Buadhach , d. 593 B.C., slain by Badhbhchadh , bur. at Cruachan; m. in Gaul to Cæsair , daughter of the King of France .

Ugaine the Great (Mòr) was the 66th Monarch of Ireland. (Mòr meaning the Great.)  The designation of Mòr was given to him due to his extensive landholdings.  Ugaine was a contemporary of Alexander the Great .  He made many military expeditions into many foreign countries.  It is said that he sailed with a fleet into the Mediterranean, landing in Africa, and also attacking Sicily.  From there he proceeded to Gaul where he was married.  He was the sovereign of all the Islands of Western Europe.  It was under his rule that the Monarchy of Ireland (Ard Righ) was made hereditary.  He divided his kingdom into twenty-five portions to prevent his children from encroaching upon one another.  Only two of his sons had issue.

Ugaine Mòr & Cæsair had twenty-five (25) children, of which twenty-two (22) were sons.

Laeghaire Lorc - ancestor of all the Leinster Heremonians.  He was the 68th Monarch of Ireland; d. assassinated by Colethach Caolbhreagh .

Colethach Caolbhreagh

Colethach Caol-bhreagh [74]

Colethach Caol-bhreagh , son of Ugaine Mòr & Cæsair, d. 541 B.C., slain by Maion (a nephew).  He was the 69th  Monarch of Ireland.  Colethach Caolbhreagh had:

Melg Molbhthach[75]

Melg Molbhthach, son of Colethach Caolbhreagh, d. 541 B.C., slain by Modhchorb.  He was the 71st Monarch of Ireland.  Melg Molbhthach had:

Iaran Gleofathach[76]

Iaran Gleofathach, son of Melg Molbhthach, d. 473, B.C., slain by Fear-Chorb.

He was the 74th Monarch of Ireland.  He was very well learned and possessed many accomplishments.  He was a king of great justice and wisdom.  Iaran Gleofathach had:

Conla Caomh[77]

Conla Caomh, son of Iaran Gleofathach, d. 442, B.C., a natural death.  He was the 74th Monarch of Ireland.  Conla Caomh had:

Olioll Cas-fiachlach[78]

Olioll Cas-fiachlach, d. 417 B.C., slain by Adhamhar Foltchaion.  He was the 77th Monarch of Ireland.  Olioll Cas-fiachlach had:

Eochaidh Alt-Leathan[79]

Eochaidh Alt-Leathan, son of Olioll Cas-fiachlach, d. 395 B.C., slain by Feargus Fortamhail.  He was the 79th Monarch of Ireland.  Eochaidh Alt-Leathan had:

Aongus (Æneas) Tuirmeach-Teamrach[80]

Aongus (Æneas) Tuirmeach-Teamrach, son of Eochaidh Alt-Leathan, d. 324 B.C., Tara (Teamhrach), slain.  Aongus was the 81st Monarch of Ireland.  Aongus had two (2) sons:

Fiacha Firmara (illegitimate), he was the ancestor of the Kings of Dalriada and Argyle in Scotland.  His name is derived from the fact that he was exposed in a small boat on the sea).

Enna Aigneach

Enna Aigneach [81]

Enna Aigneach , son of Aongus, d. 292 B.C., killed by Criomthan Cosgrach .  Enna Aigneach was the 84th Monarch of Ireland.  He had a bountiful disposition, and was magnficent in his donations.  Enna Aigneach had:

Assaman Eamhna[82]

Assaman Eamhna, son of Enna Aigneach , had:

Reighen Ruadh [83]

Reighen Ruadh , son of Assaman Eamhna.  During his lifetime most of the cattle in Ireland died of murrain.  Reighen Ruadh had:

Fionnlogh [84]

Fionnlogh , son of Reighen Ruadh , had a son:

Fionn [85]

Fionn , son of Fionnlogh , m. Benia , daughter of Criomthan .  Fionn & Benia had two (2) sons:

son

Eochaidh Feidlioch

Eochaidh Feidlioch [86]

Eochaidh Feidlioch , son of Fionn & Benia , d. 130 B.C., at Tara; m. Clothfionn , daughter of Eochaidh Uchtleathan .  Eochaidh Feidlioch was the 93rd Monarch of Ireland.  He erected a Royal Palace in Conacht, built in what is now called Craughan.  Clothfionn, his queen, was a very virtuous lady.  Eochaidh Feidlioch & Clothfionn had four (4) children:

Breas , triplet, d. slain at the battle of Dromchriadh

Nar , triplet, d. slain at the battle of Dromchriadh

Bress-Nar -Lothar (the Fineamhas), triplet, d. slain at the battle of Dromchriadh

Maedhbh , m. Oilioll Mór, son of Ros Ruadh of Leinster

Princess Maedhbh on Tinne, hereditary Queen of Conacht ; d. slain by Ferbhuidhe ; m1st Timme , d. slain by Maceacht ; m2nd Oilioll Mòr , dd. slain by Conall  Cearnach

Bress-Nar -Lothar (or Finemhnas )[87]

Bress-Nar -Lothar (or Finemhnas), son of Eochaidh Feidlioch & Clothfionn.  The practice of burying the dead beneath the surface of the earth was begun during this time.  Previously a body had been laid on the surface and stones were heaped over it.  Finemhnas had a son:

Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg[88]

Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg, son of Bress-Nar-Lothar, d. 8 B.C., killed himself by falling on his sword; m. Dearborguill, daughter of the King of Denmark.  Lughaidh was the 98th Monarch of Ireland.  He formed an alliance with the King of Denmark, at which time he married the kings daughter Dearborguill.  Lughaidh & Dearborguill had:

With this generation begins the change of the marking of the passage of time.

Previous generations are counted B.C. and those following as A.D.

Crimthann-Niadh-Nar, The Heroic[89]

Crimthann-Niadh-Nar, son of Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg, d. 9, from a fall from his horse; m. Nar-Taht-Chaoch, daughter of Laoch, son of Daire, who lived in the land of the Picts.  Crimthann-Niadh-Nar was the 100th Monarch of Ireland.  During the time of his reign, Jesus Christ was born.  Crimthann made expeditions to Britain and Gaul. He assisted the Picts and Britians in their wars against the Romans.  Crimthann-Niadh-Nar & Nar-Taht-Chaoch had:

Feredach Fionn -Feachtnach[90]

Feredach Fionn Feachtnach , son of Crimthann-Niadh-Nar & Nar-That-Chaoch, d. 36, at the regal city at Tara, of natural causes.  Feredach Fionn Feachtnach was the 102nd Monarch of Ireland.  The name feachtnach  was given to him because of his truth  and sincerity.  Feredach Fionn Feachtnach had:

Fiacha Fionn Ola [91]

Fiacha Fionn Ola , son of Feredach Fionn-Feachtnach, d. 56, slain by Eiliomh MacCorach , of the Race of Ir; m. Eithne , daughter of the King of Alba .  Fiacha Fionn Ola was the 104th Monarch of Ireland.  He reigned for 17 years before he was slain.  Eithne being near the time of her delivery, at the time of her husband’s death, went into labour and delivered their son just after his death.  Fiacha Fionn Ola & Eithne had:

Tuathal Teachtmar [92]

Tuathal Teachtmar , son of Fiacha Fionna Ola & Eithne , b. 56; d. 106, slain by Mal (his successor); m. Baine , daughter of Sgaile Balbh , King of England.  Tuathal was the 106th Monarch of Ireland.  After coming of age, Tuathal gathered his friends and with the aid of his grandfather, the king of Alba, came into Ireland and fought over a hundred battles.  There were twenty-five battles in Ulster; twenty-five battles in Leinster; twenty-five battles in Connaught; and thirty-five in Munster.  Tuathal created the county of Meath by taking four tracts of land for the neighboring “counties”, establishing it as the seat of the Monarchy.  Here he built a royal palace at Tailtean.  On Lewy’s Day, a fair was held near the grave of Queen Tailte , at which time those of suitable age for marriage were brought together.  Here marriage articles (contracts) were agreed upon and ceremonies performed.  He established a royal tribute to be paid yearly by the provincial Kings.  He imposed a large fine on the provience of Leinster, in retaliation for the death of this two daughters.  The fine which was to be paid every two years, was composed of:

6,000 cows/beeves

6,000 fat muttons

6,000 hogs

6,000 mantles

6,000 ounces silver

12,000 cauldrons of brass

The fine was extracted from the citizenry quite punctually, although it was sometimes taken by fire and sword.  This fine contined afterwards for upwards of six hundred (600) years.  Tuathal & Baine had three (3) children:

Fithir , (daughter), d. killed

Darina , (daughter), d. killed

Fedhlimidh Rachtmar

Fedhlimidh (Felim) Rachtmar[93]

Fedhlimidh (Felim) Rachtmar, son of Tuathal Teachtmar & Baine, d. 119, of thirst; m. Ughna, daughter of the King of Denmark.  Felim reigned as the 108th Monarch of Ireland.  He was known as a maker of excellent wholesome laws.  His reign was a time of peace, quiet, plenty and security.  Fedhlimidh & Ughna had three (3) chidren:

Eochaidh Fionn-Fohart

Fiacha Suidhe

Conn Ceadcathach

Conn Ceadcathach

Conn Ceadcathach (or Monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles), son of Fedhlimidh (Felim), d. 157, Tara, murdered by Tiobraidhe Tireach (grandson) of Rochruidhe, King of Ulster.

Conn earned the title “of the Hundred Battles” from the 100 battles that he fought and won.  Of the 100 battles, 60 were against Cahir Mór, King of Leinster - 109th Monarch of Ireland.  Conn slew Cahir Mór and succeeded him as Monarch of Ireland.  Conn battled against the Ulsterians and Owen Mór, in Munster.  Conn was king of Connacht.  He made the seat of his monarchy, Tara[94].  Conn’s reign lasted for 35 years, until his death.[95]

Conn Caedcathach had six (6) children:

Art Eanfhear

Conla Ruadh, d. murdered, by his uncles Eochaidh Fionn -Foihar & Fiacha Suidhe .

Crionna, d. murdered, by his uncles Eochaidh Fionn -Foihar & Fiacha Suidhe .

Sarad , m. Conaire Mac Mogha Laine , 111th Monarch

Maoin (daughter)

Sabina (or Sadhbh) , m. MacNiadh, half King of Munster ; m2nd Olioll Olum .  Olioll Olum gave his wife’s uncles, Eochaidh Fionn -Foihar & Fiacha Suidhe ,  a district of land which lies in the present day Waterford County, Ireland.

Art Eanfhear [96]

Art Eanfhear , son of the Monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles , d. 195 a.d., at the battle of Magh Muroimhe(muccrove), in the county of Galway, Ireland; m. Maedhbh Leathdearg , daughter of Conann Cualann .

Art Eanfhear roughly translates to The Man, or God of War.  He is the ancestor of the O’Hart family.  They were the Princes of Tara and Chiefs in Sligo.  The town of Rath Maedhbhe, which is located near Tara, takes its name from her.  They family arms are described as:

ARMS:  Gu, a lion passant guardant or, in base a human heart argent.

CREST:  A dexter cubit arm holding a flaming sword all ppr.

MOTTO:  Fortiter et fideliter.

Art Eanfhear & Maedhbh Leathdearg had four (4) sons:

Artghen

Boindia

Bonnrigh

Cormac Ulfhada

Sarad

Sarad , daughter of the Monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles , m. Conaire Mac Mogha Laine , 111th Monarch of Ireland.  Conaire Mac Mogha Laine & Sarah had three (3) sons:

Cairbre , aka Eochaidh Riada

Cairbre Bascaon

Cairbre Musc

Sabina

Sabina (or Sadhbh), daughter of the Monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles, m. MacNiadh, half King of Munster; m2nd Olioll Olum.  Olioll Olum gave his wife’s uncles, Eochaidh Fionn-Foihar & Fiacha Suidhe,  a district of land which lies in the present day Waterford County, Ireland.  MacNiadh & Sabina had a son:

Maccon

Olioll Olum & Sabina had  nine (9) sons, seven of which were slain by their half brother Maccon, in the battle of Magh Mucroimhe, in the county of Galway.

Cormac “Cormac Mac Art” Ulfhada[97]

Cormac “Cormac Mac Art” Ulfhada, son of Art Eanfhear & Maedhbh Leathdearg, d. 266, choked on salmon, Cleitach, on the Bayne, bur. near Slane, county of Meath, Ireland; m. Eithne, daughter of Dunlang, King of Leinster.

Cormac Mac Art was the 115th Monarch of Ireland, reigning for 40 years.  He was called Ulfhada because of his long beard.  He was the wisest, most learned and best of any of his race before him to rule the kingdom.  During his reign Tara was established as the capital of the province (the combined kingdoms of Connacht and Meath).  Tara is located 25 miles NW of Dublin (the hill of Tara).  Upon the hill of Tara, Cormac build great banqueting halls.  Every three (3) years he ordered an assembly of the Irish kings to Tara to discuss the law and hold festivals of music and poetry.

He was to all a very just and upright in his actions.  He ordained many good laws.  Under Cormac’s direction colleges were established at Tara where the study of military science, law, history and literature were taught.  Cormac abdicated the throne after losing an eye.  He spent the time after his abdication, preparing several treatises.  Of these one was on the education for kingship, and several were on law.

In the 7th year before his death, God revealed to him the light of His Faith, from that time forward he prohibited the Druids from worshipping their idol-gods.  Cormac Mac Art openly professed that he would no longer worship any but the true God of the Universe, the Immortal and Invisible King of the Ages.  He enacted several good laws.  He wrote several treaties, including “Kingly Government”.   A poem relating to the death of King Cormac was written:

“The Burial of King Cormac

by Sir Samuel Ferguson

“Crom Cruach and his sub-gods twelve,”

Said Cormac, “are but craven treene;

The axe that made them, haft or helve,

Had worthier of our worship been;

 

“But he who made the tree to grow,

And hid in earth the iron stone,

And made the man with mind to know

The axe’s use, is God alone.”

*              *              *              *              *

“The Druids hear of this fearful speech, and are horrified!

“They loosed their curse against the King.

They cursed him in his flesh and bones,

And daily in their mystic ring

They turned the maedictive stones.”

Cormac Ulfhada instructed that after his death, that he should be buried at Ross-na-Ri near Slane in Meath, his face looking towards the East in honor and respect for the Saviour of the World.  He maintained a magnificent household, keeping 1,150 attendants daily attending at his Great Hall at Tara.  The Great Hall at Tara was 300 feet long, 30 cubits high and 50 cubits broad, having 14 doors.  At his daily meals the service of plate, flagons, drinking cups of gold, silver, and precious stone, at his table, ordinarily consisted of 150 pieces, other than the dishes, which were all pure silver or gold.  He order that 10 trusted persons should constantly attend to him (and his successors - Monarchs of Ireland) and they should never be absent from him.  The ten consisted of:[98]

·         Nobleman - to be his companion

·         Judge - to explain & deliver the laws of the country in the King’s presence at all occasions.

·         Historian - to declare & preserve the genealogies, acts and occurrences of the nobility and gentry as occasion required.

·         *Druid/Magician - to offer sacrifice, presage good or bad omens, according to his ability.

·         Physician - to administer physic to the king, queen & royal family.

·         Musician - to compose music, sing pleasant sonnets in the King’s presence when called upon to do so.

·         3 Stewards - to govern the King’s House

This custom was followed by succeeding Monarch’s to the 175th Monarch of Ireland, and from the 60th down from Cormac.  *The only alteration was when they changed to the Christian faith - they changed the Druid/Magician to a Prelate of the Church.

Cormac Ulfhada & Eithne had sixteen (16) children, of these only eight (8) are found to have any account given:

a)       Cairbre Lifeachar

b)       Muireadach, no issue

c)       Moghruith, no issue

d)       Ceallach, no issue

e)       Daire, no issue.

f)        Aongus Fionn, no issue.

g)       Grace (Grania) , m. Fionn, son of Cubhall .  Fionn was a great champion and general of the Irish Militia.

h)       Ailbh (alve), m. Fionn (as his 2nd wife), son of Cubhall .  Fionn was a great  champion and general of the Irish Militia.

Cairbre -Lifeachar

Cairbre -Lifeachar , son of King Cormac Mac Art & Eithue, d. 284, slain by Simeon , son of Ceirb , at the battle of Ceirb.

Cairbre -Lifeachar was the 117th Monarch of Ireland.  Under his rule, he order that the history and the genealogy of the Kings to be compiled.  He also had these books, The White Book and The Book of the Conquest and Invasions, written[99].  His name his name is derived from his being nursed by the side of the Liffy Rive on which the city of Dublin was built.  He ruled for 17 years before he was killed.

Cairbre -Lifeachar had three (3) sons:

I.             Eochaidh Dubhlen

II.            Eocho

III.             Fiacha Srabhteine , 120th Monarch of Ireland.  This line joins to the European Ancestry - Rulers of Scotland/Dalridia.

Eochaidh Dubhlen

I.  Eochaidh Dubhlen , son of Cairbre Lifeachar , m. Alechia , daughter of Updar, King of Alba .  His name Dubhlen is Irish for “black stream”, this references his being nursed in the city of Dublin.   The waters of the river Liffey, which flow through the city of  Dublin are dark in color.  Eochaidh Dubhlen & Alechia had three (3) sons, who were known as “The Three Collas”:

A.       Muiredach or Colla da Chrioch (or Facrioch), meaning as “Colla of the Two Countries”

B.       Carioll , or Colla Uais , meaning “Colla the Noble”

C.      Colla Meann,  meaning “Colla the Famous”

Fiacha Srabhteine[100]

III.  Fiacha Srabhteine, son of Eochaidh Dubhlen, m. Aoife, daughter of the King of Gall Gaodhal.  He was the 120th Monarch of Ireland.  He is the ancestor of O’Neill, Princes of Tyrone.  He was given his name for his having been fostered at Dunsrabhteine, in Connaught.  Where he had been a provincial King before being elevated to Monarch. .  This line joins to the European Ancestry - Rulers of Scotland/Dalridia.

Colla Uais[101]

Colla Uais, son of Eochaidh Dubhlen, 121st Monarch of Ireland, during the 4th Century.

 

Among the families who descend from Colla Uais are:  Agnew, Alexander, Doneland, Flinn, Healy, Howard ( English ), MacAllister, MacClean, MacDonald, lords of the Isles, and chiefs of Glencoe, MacDonnell, of Antrim; MacDoughal, MacDowell, MacEvoy, MacHale, MacRoy, MacVeagh, MacVeigh, MacSheehy, O’Brassil, Ouseley, Rogers, Saunders, Saunderson, Sheehy, Wesley, and others.[102]

 

Colla Uais had three (3) sons:

 

A.                   Eochaidh, son of Colla Uais,

B.                   Roghain ancestor of O’Fiachry, MacUais, Rowan

C.                  Fiachra Tort, ancestor of O’Flinn

Eochaidh[103]

Eochaidh, son of Colla Uais, had:

Earc (or Eachach)

Earc (or Eachach), son of Eochaidh, had:[104]

Carthann [105]

Carthann , son of Earc .  “carthann” Irish meaning charity, friendship, kindness.  Carthann had seven (7) children:

A.                   Earc

B.                   St. Teresa, virgin , whose Feast is commemorated on the 8th July.

C.                  Muireadhach (saints descend from this line)

D.                  Forgo (saints descend from this line)

E.                   Olioll  (saints descend from this line)

F.                   Laoghaire  (saints descend from this line)

G.                  Tren  (saints descend from this line)

Earc , King of Dal Riada

Earc , son of Carthann .  Earc was the King of Dal Riada during the 5th Century.  He descends from the formerly pagan sacral Ulidian or Fir-Bolg royal house.  Earc had three (3) sons: [106]

1.      Fergus Mór

2.      Loarn/Lorn

3.      Angus

Fergus Mór

1.  Fergus Mór , son of Earc , went to Scotland.  Fergus Mór had: [107]

1a.  Godfraidh

Loarn/Lorn

2.      Loarn/Lorn , son of Earc . Loarn was, King of Dal Riada during the 5th Century  Loarn had a daughter:

2a.  Earca m. Muireadach , son of Eoghan .

Godfraidh Mac Fergus

1a.  Godfraidh Mac Fergus, son of Fergus, Lord of Hebrides, d. 853[108].  Godfraih Mac Fergus had a son:

                Main

Earca

2a.  Earca, daughter of Loarn, King of Dal Riada, m. Muireadach, son of Eoghan.  Muireadach & Earca had two (2) sons:

2a1.  Muirceartach Mac Earca

2a2.  Fergus Mór Mac Earca  See European Ancestry/Rulers of Ireland & Scotland.

Maine

Maine, son of Gothfrith, had: [109]

Niallgus

Niallgus, son of Main, had: [110]

Suibhneach

Suibhneach, son of Niallgus, had: [111]

Meargach

Meargach (Ineargach), son of Suibhneach, had: [112]

Solamh

Solamh (Solomon ) , son of Meargach, had: [113]

Gille Adomanan [114]

Gille Adomanan (Giolla Adhamnan ), son of Solamh. During the his lifetime, the Norse had succeeded in gaining possession of his ancestral lands of Lorn in Argyll, and the isles of Mull, Coll and Tiree.  Gille Adomanan had a son:

Gille Bride  (See MacDonnell for further descendants).


ENDNOTES

MILESIUS ANCESTRY - ANCIENT IRISH NOBILITY

[1] “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 44
[2]
Adam through Japhet from Holy Bible, Gen 2:7 through Gen 10:2; and “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 44
[3]
"Biblical Genealogical Information extracted from Dr. James H. Stallings "A Supplement to Stalling Family Records" 1981, Edited and amended by Patsy Chappelear,  February 1994.  Patsy Chappelear, 9714 South Rice Ave, Houston, TX 77096 e-mail:  PSC@imb.imb.UH.edu.
[4]
"Biblical Genealogical Information extracted from Dr. James H. Stallings "A Supplement to Stalling Family Records" 1981, Edited and amended by Patsy Chappelear,  February 1994.  Patsy Chappelear, 9714 South Rice Ave, Houston, TX 77096 e-mail:  PSC@imb.imb.UH.edu.
[5]
"Biblical Genealogical Information extracted from Dr. James H. Stallings "A Supplement to Stalling Family Records" 1981, Edited and amended by Patsy Chappelear,  February 1994.  Patsy Chappelear, 9714 South Rice Ave, Houston, TX 77096 e-mail:  PSC@imb.imb.UH.edu.
[6]
"Biblical Genealogical Information extracted from Dr. James H. Stallings "A Supplement to Stalling Family Records" 1981, Edited and amended by Patsy Chappelear,  February 1994.  Patsy Chappelear, 9714 South Rice Ave, Houston, TX 77096 e-mail:  PSC@imb.imb.UH.edu.
[7]
"Biblical Genealogical Information extracted from Dr. James H. Stallings "A Supplement to Stalling Family Records" 1981, Edited and amended by Patsy Chappelear,  February 1994.  Patsy Chappelear, 9714 South Rice Ave, Houston, TX 77096 e-mail:  PSC@imb.imb.UH.edu.
[8]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 44
[9]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 44
[10]
"Biblical Genealogical Information extracted from Dr. James H. Stallings "A Supplement to Stalling Family Records" 1981, Edited and amended by Patsy Chappelear,  February 1994.  Patsy Chappelear, 9714 South Rice Ave, Houston, TX 77096 e-mail:  PSC@imb.imb.UH.edu.
[11]
"Biblical Genealogical Information extracted from Dr. James H. Stallings "A Supplement to Stalling Family Records" 1981, Edited and amended by Patsy Chappelear,  February 1994.  Patsy Chappelear, 9714 South Rice Ave, Houston, TX 77096 e-mail:  PSC@imb.imb.UH.edu.
[12]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 44
[13]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 44
[14] “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 47, 48
[15]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 47, 48; and “The Celts  Uncovering the Mythic and Historic Origins of Western Culture”, by Jean Markale, p. 107.
[16]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 48
[17]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M.L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 6
[18]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 30
[19]
“Irish Pedigrees, Volume I”, by John O’Hart, pp. 32-37
[20]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49
[21] [21] “Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M.L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11
[22]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49
[23]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 31, 49
[24]
  “Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M.L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11
[25]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49
[26]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M.L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11[27] “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49
[28]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49
[29]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49
[30]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49
[31]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 49, 50
[32]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M.L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11
[33]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[34]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[35]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[36]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[37] “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[38]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[39]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[40]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[41]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[42]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[43]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M.L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11
44]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50
[45]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 50-55; 352
[46]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M. L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11
[47]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M.L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11
[48]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M. L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11, 12
[49]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M. L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11, 12
[50] “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 351, 352
[51]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 352
[52]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 352
[53]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 352
[54]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 352, 253
[55]
“Irish Pedigrees: or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989,  pp. 32-37
[56]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353
[57]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353
[58]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353
[59]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353
[60]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353
[61]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353
[62]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353
[63]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 353, 354
[64]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[65]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[66]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[67]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[68]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[69]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[70]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[71]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[72]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[73]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 354
[74]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[75]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[76]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[77]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 35
[78]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[79]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[80]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[81]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[82]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[83]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[84]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[85]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, p. 355
[86]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 355, 356
[87]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 356
[88]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 356
[89]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 356
[90]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 356, 357
[91]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 357
[92]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 357, 358
[93] “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 359
[94]
“The Celts Uncovering the Mythic and Historic Origins of Western Culture”, by Jean Markale, p. 111
[95]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 358, 359
[96]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 359
[97]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 356, 666, 667; and “The Celts Uncovering the Mythic and Historic Origins of Western Culture”, by Jean Markale, p. 117
[98]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 665, 666
[99]
“Genealogical History of the Milesian Families of Ireland with the Monument to Brian Boroimhe: The Chart of The Armorial Bearings of the Same Families”, compiled & edited by B.W. DeCourcy, published by W.F. Overdiek and M. L. Riegel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1880, p. 11
[100]
  “Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 668
[101]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[102]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 669
[103]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[104]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[105]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[106]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528; and “The Highland Clans”, Moncreiffed & Hicks (1967, Clarkson N. Potter, Inc., Publisher, New York), back inner cover.
107]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[108]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[109]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[110]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[111]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[112]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[113]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528
[114]
“Irish Pedigrees; or, The Origin and Stem of The Irish Nation.” By John O’Hart, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1989, pp. 527, 528